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Contact: Paul C. DiNero
E-mail: dinerop@kean.edu

Plainfield Residents to Present Research at Computer Science Conference

UNION, NJ - Kean University’s Swetha Medicherla ’10 of South Plainfield and Johana Callegari ’11 of North Plainfield will present their research at the ACM SIGMM International Conference on Multimedia Information Retrieval (MIR) in Philadelphia, Pa. March 29 - March 31. The conference is the premier scientific meeting for discussing the latest advances in the area of multimedia retrieval.

Medicherla, a McNair scholar at Kean University and computer science major, will present Visualization for Increased Understanding and Learning using Augmented Reality. Conducted under the supervision of Dr. George Chang, chair of the Department of Computer Science and Technology, Medicherla studied how to develop augmented reality learning environments for education.

Callegari, also a computer science major, will present, Assessment of the Utility of Tag Clouds for Faster Image Retrieval. Her paper will be published in the conference proceedings. Callegari’s work studied how the selection of tag words to be associated with visual images could impact the retrieval speed of the images later. Callegari, a National Science Foundation Computer Science Scholarship recipient and a McNair Scholar at Kean, conducted her research under the supervision of Dr. Patricia Morreale of the Department of Computer Science and Technology.

Founded in 1855, Kean University has become one of the largest metropolitan institutions of higher education in the region, boasting a richly diverse student, faculty and staff population. While Kean continues to play a key role in the training of teachers, it is also a hub of educational, technological and cultural enrichment, offering more than 50 undergraduate degrees and more than 45 options leading to a master’s degree, doctorate, professional diploma and/or state certification(s). Five undergraduate colleges and the Nathan Weiss Graduate College now serve more than 15,000 students.