Gender Issues in Computer Science/Mathematics

A selected bibliography

Danielle R. Bernstein - Kean University

Barinaga, M. (11 March 1994). Surprises across the cultural divide. Science, 263, 1468-1472.

Benston, M. (1988). Women's voices/men's voices: technology as language. In C. Kramarae (Ed.), Technology and Women's Voices (pp. 15-28). London: Routledge & Kegan.

Bernstein, D. (1997).Is Teaching Computer Science Different from Teaching Other Sciences?Proceedings of 13th Eastern Small College Computing Conference, Pomona, NJ, 137-143.

Bernstein, D. (1997). Computing, Diversity and Community: Fostering the Computing Culture. Proceedings of the 28th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, San Jose, CA, 101-105.

Brown, J., Andreae, P., Biddle, R. and Tempero, E. (1997). Women in introductory computer science: Experience at Victoria University in Wellington. Proceedings of the 28th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, San Jose, CA.

Camp, T. (1997). The incredible shrinking pipeline. Communications of the ACM, 40(10), 103-110.

Cook, C. (1997). CS0: Computer Science Orientation Course. Proceedings of the 28th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, San Jose, CA, February 27-March 1, 1997. 87-91.

Deremer, D. (1993). Improving the learning environment in CS 1 - Experiences in communication strategies. SIGCSE Bulletin, 25(3), 31-38.

Didion, C. (1997). Mentoring-An essential teaching tool. Journal of College Science Teaching, Dec. 1997/Jan. 1998, Pg. 173.

Didion, C. (1996). Motivating women students. Journal of College Science Teaching, 15(5), Pg. 439.

Felder, R. (1996). Student resistance to group work. From felder@EOS.NCSU.EDU.

Fisher, A., Margolis, J. and Miller, F. (1997). Undergraduate women in computer science: Experience, motivation and culture. Proceedings of the 28th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, San Jose, CA., 106-110.

Gersting, J. and Young, F. (1997). Content + Experiences = Curriculum. Proceedings of the 28th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, San Jose, CA, February 27-March 1, 1997, 325-329.

Haller, S. M. and Fossum, T.V. (1998). Retaining women with accessible role models. Proceedings of the 29th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, Atlanta, GA., 73-76.

Klawe, M. & Levenson, N. (1995). Women in Computing: Where are we now? CACM, 38(1), 29-42.

Henes, R. (1994). Creating gender equity in your teaching. College of Engineering, University of California, Davis.

Kellermeier, J. (1995). Mathematics, Gender and Culture Sample Syllabus

Kerner, J. and Vargas, K. (1994). Women and computers: What we can learn from science. SIGCSE Bulletin, 26(2), 52-56.

Kolesar, M.V. & Allan, V.H. (1995). Teaching computer science concepts and problem solving with a spreadsheet. Proceedings of the 26th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, Nashville, TN, 10-13.

Linn, M. and Hyde, J. (1989). Gender, mathematics, and science. Educational Researcher, 18(8), 17-19, 22-27.

Linn, M. (1994). The tyranny of the mean: Gender and expectations. American Mathematical Society, 41(7), 766-769.

Liu, M. and Blanc, L. (1996). On the retention of female computer science students. Proceedings of the 27th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, Philadelphia, PA, February 15-18, 1996, 32-36.

Morell, V. (29 March, 1996). Computer culture deflects women and minorities. Science, 271, 1915-1916.

New England Consortium for Undergraduate Science Education. (1996). Achieving gender equity in science classrooms. Brown University.

Seymour, E. and Hewitt, N. (1997). Talking about leaving: Why undergraduates leave the sciences. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. Reviewed by D. R. Bernstein

Seymour, E. (1995). The loss of women from science, mathematics, and engineering undergraduate majors: An explanatory account. Science Education, 79(4), 437-473.

Teague, J. and Clarke, V. (1996). Improving gender equity in computer programmes: Some suggestions for increasing female participation and retention rates. Proceedings of the first Australasian Conference on Computer Science Education, July 3-5, 1996, Sydney, Australia, 164-170.

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Last Updated on 15 May, 2000