A Guide for Compiling a

Teacher Work Sample

Portfolio

 

Performance Requirements

Teaching Processes

Standards and Indicators

Scoring Rubrics

 

 

College of Education

Kean University

AY 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Teacher Work Sample

NCATE accredited since 1950†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† adopted by College of Education 12/06


Portfolio Committee

 

 

 

Angela Caruso

Barbara Lee, Ph.D.

Jo Hoffman, Ed.D

Rosalyn Lenhoff, Ed.D.

Patricia Klein

Mary Jo Santo Pietro, Ph.D.

Beverly Kling, Ed.D.

Charlotte Sciarpelletti

Michael Knight, Ph.D.

Ethel Young, Ph.D.

 

 

 

Teacher Work Sample (TWS) Committee

 

Dr. J. Amorino

Dr. M. Knight

Prof. M. Bocchino

Dr. B. Lee

Dr. L. Cahir

Dr. L. Lorentzen

Prof. A. Caruso

Dr. M. Mobley

Dr. G. DelRisco

Dr. F. Osborne

Prof. R. Evans

Dr. J. Oussaty

Dr. J. Hoffman

Dr. V. Rodriguez

Dr. L. Schraer-Joiner

Dr. D. Schuman

Dr. D. Joiner

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2008 (Revised)

 

 

NCATE OFFICE

TEACHING PERFORMANCE CENTER

Kean University

Kean University

College of Education

College of Education

Willis Hall, Room 104

Willis Hall, Room 110

Union, NJ07083

Union, NJ07083

 

 

Phone:(908) 737-4266

Phone:(908)737-4185

Fax:(908)737-4265

Fax:(908) 737-4115

Email:ncate@kean.edu

Email:tpc@kean.edu

 

 

 

Dr. Frank J. Esposito, Interim Dean

College of Education

 

 



Table of Contents

 

 

I.††††††††† The SPECTRUM Model:Kean Universityí Conceptual

††††††††††† Framework for Teacher Education........................................................................ 1

 

II.††††††† College of Education Mission Statement.............................................................. 3

 

III.†††††† College of Education Learning Outcomes/Institutional Standards...................... 4

 

IV.†††††† Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Preparation

†††††††††††† A.What is a Teacher Work Sample Portfolio?......................................................... 7

†††††††††††† B.Instructions for Compiling a Teacher Work Sample Portfolio................................ 7

†††††††††††† C.Description of the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Process................................. 8

†††††††††††† D.Candidate Responsibilities for Implementation of the TWS................................... 9

†††††††††††† E.Evaluating the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio................................................... 11

††††††††††††† F.Introduction to Portfolio Rubric......................................................................... 14

††††††††††††† G.Philosophy Statement Rubric............................................................................ 15

††††††††††††† H.Writing Mechanics and Organization Rubric...................................................... 16

 

V.††† ††† Teacher Work Sample

††††††††††† Overview of Teacher Work Sample Portfolio........................................................... 19

†††††††††† Teaching Processes Assessed by the Teacher Work Sample.................................... 20

††††††††††† Contextual Factors.................................................................................................. 22

††††††††† Contextual Factors Rubric....................................................................................... 23

††††††††† Learning Goals........................................................................................................ 24

††††††††† Learning Goals Rubric............................................................................................. 25

††††††††† Assessment Plan...................................................................................................... 26

†††††††††† Example of Assessment Plan Table.......................................................................... 27

††††††††† Assessment Plan Rubric........................................................................................... 28

†††††††††† Design for Instruction............................................................................................... 29

††††††††† Design for Instruction Rubric.................................................................................... 30

††††††††† Instructional Decision-Making.................................................................................. 31

††††††††† Instructional Decision-Making Rubric....................................................................... 32

††††††††† Analysis of Student Learning.................................................................................... 33

†††††††††† Analysis of Student Learning Rubric......................................................................... 34

†††††††††† Reflection and Self-Evaluation.................................................................................. 35

†† †††††††† Reflection and Self-Evaluation Rubric....................................................................... 37

††††††††† Processes of Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Form.............................. 38

†††††††††† Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form.................................................... 39

††††††††††† Integration of Teacher Work Sample Processes & COE Learning Goals................... 40

 

VIII.††††† References.......................................................................................................... 41


I.The Spectrum Model

Kean Universityís Conceptual Framework for Teacher Education

 

 

Kean Universityís College of Education prepares its graduates to be informed, dynamic professionals in diverse settings.Toward that end, a basic curriculum model called the SPECTRUM has been adopted to provide teacher education students with the knowledge, skills and dispositions (values) to become informed, dynamic professionals.

 

Webster defines a spectrum as an array of components, separated and arranged in order of some varying characteristics.[1]Kean University models its SPECTRUM as a series of circles.The center or locus of the circle is the informed, dynamic professional whose development is created by the intersection of three smaller inner circles representing knowledge, skills, and dispositions (values).Each of the small circles is interconnected, giving and receiving input from the classroom, school, community, state, nation and world.Surrounding the inner core is a larger circle that establishes boundaries of professional studies, field experience, academic specialties and general education.The turning of the circles emphasizes that development of an informed, dynamic professional is interconnected, interdependent and interrelated.The colors of the SPECTRUM blend together as do the content, process and context of the College of Education.Each course and field experience contribute to the sum of an educator who is well grounded in basic skills and in content knowledge, is competent in the practices of instruction as measured by the learning success of students, and is a reflective member of the larger community of learners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I.†††††† The Spectrum Model (continued)

Kean Universityís Conceptual Framework for Teacher Education

 

 

KNOWLEDGE

 

 
 

 

 

 


Knowing subject matter, instructional strategies, learning theory,

and the community where you teach;

based on mastery of content, theory and critical thinking.

 

 

 

 

 

SKILLS

 

 
 

 

 

 


Facilitating and assessing P-12 student learning,

managing the classroom;

based on knowledge, practice and experience.

 

 

 

 

DISPOSITIONS/VALUES

 

 
 

 

 

 

 


Making a commitment to the profession, having enthusiasm for teaching;

caring, fairness, honesty, responsibility and social justice;

based on beliefs about the world.

 

 

 

 


II.               College Of Education Mission Statement

 

 

The mission of the College of Education, based on our conceptual framework, is to prepare informed, dynamic professionals for diverse settings who:

 

1.†††††††† demonstrate a broad background in humanities, mathematics, and the sciences, have an in-depth understanding of one academic discipline, and apply this knowledge and understanding in their professional settings;

 

2.†††††††† think creatively and critically in solving educational problems and make sound decisions based on their knowledge of theory;

 

3.†††††††† design and integrate a variety of instructional strategies and technologies matched to appropriate diverse learning styles;

 

4.†††††††† accurately assess, analyze, and monitor student learning; make appropriate adjustments to instruction, and have a positive effect on all students;

 

5.†††††††† recognize, respect and respond appropriately to individual and cultural differences;

 

6.†††††††† establish professional and collaborative relationships among all educational stakeholders;

 

7.†††††††† commit to be life-long learners and advocates of quality schooling for all.

 

 

 

 

 

Adopted, College of Education, October 4, 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III.College Of Education Learning Outcomes

 

 

The College of Education has defined a set of learning outcomes that candidates must meet reflecting the SPECTRUM conceptual framework of Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions (Values).Every individual program within the College also has developed a set of specific learning outcomes reflecting knowledge, skills, and dispositions of particular disciplines.In order to graduate and/or be certified, candidates must show evidence that they have achieved both college and program outcomes.The portfolio is one way in which students demonstrate their achievements.The College of Education learning outcomes that appear below are aligned with the New Jersey Professional Teaching Standards.

 

Knowledge

 

(A)†††††† Subject Matter

 

The beginning teacher has a thorough understanding and knowledge of subject matter and national, professional, and New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards, and uses such knowledge to create effective learning experiences for students.

 

(B)†††††† Student Learning

 

The beginning teacher has knowledge of how students learn and develop and creates opportunities for each studentís academic development.

 

(C)†††††† Diversity of Learners

†††††††††††

The beginning teacher understands differences in how students learn and knows how to provide instruction to accommodate such diversity.

 

(D)†††††† Classroom Management

 

††††††††††† The beginning teacher understands classroom management theories.

 

(E)†††††† Assessment

 

The beginning teacher knows how to assess, evaluate, analyze, and monitor student learning.

 

Skills

 

(A)†††††† Planning Instruction

†††††††††††

The beginning teacher plans instruction based on knowledge of subject matter, of national, professional, and New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards, of students, and of curriculum goals and models.

(B)†††††† Instructional Strategies/Technologies

 

The beginning teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies and technologies that encourage each student to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

 

(C)†††††† Learning Environment

 

The beginning teacher creates a learning environment that encourages active, engaged learning, positive interaction, and self-motivation for all students.

 

(D)†††††† Communication and Technology

 

The beginning teacher effectively communicates in the classroom by using a variety of communication skills including verbal and nonverbal techniques, technology, and media.

 

(E)†††††† Assessment

 

The beginning teacher effectively uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate student progress and makes appropriate adjustments to instruction based on his/her assessment.

 

(F)†††††† Student Support

 

The beginning teacher works with parents/family members, school colleagues, and community members to support student learning and development.

 

(G)†††††† Reflection and Professional Development

 

The beginning teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of her/his choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally.

 

Dispositions/Values

†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† ††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

(A)†††††† Diversity/Individual Differences

 

The beginning teacher appreciates individual, cultural, and linguistic differences, shows respect for the diverse talents of all learners, and is committed to helping develop self-confidence and competence.

 

(B)†††††† High Expectations

 

The beginning teacher believes that all students can learn at high levels and persists in helping all students achieve success.

 

 

(C)†††††† Community/Culture

†††††††††††

The beginning teacher works productively within community and cultural norms.

 

(D)†††††† Positive Climate

 

The beginning teacher takes responsibility for establishing a positive climate in the classroom and participates in maintaining such a climate in the school as a whole.

 

(E)†††††† Positive Role Model

 

††††††††††† The beginning teacher recognizes her/his responsibility to serve as a positive role model.

 

(F)†††††† Life-long Learner

 

The beginning teacher is a life-long learner who seeks out opportunities for continued growth.

 

 

 

 

 

Approved, College of Education, October 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IV.††† A Guide to Compiling a Teacher Work Sample Portfolio

 

 

A.††††††† What is a Teacher Work Sample Portfolio?

 

A Teacher Work Sample Portfolio documents the candidatesí achievements over the course of a teacher preparation program at Kean University at the core of which is the impact the candidate has on P-12 student learning.It includes the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) files that demonstrate evidence of P-12 student learning.The TWS must show satisfactory achievement of the learning outcomes of the College of Education and the candidatesí program of study, as well as evidence of P-12 student learning.The format of the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio may be traditional print and/or electronic multimedia file.

 

During the Introductory and Preprofessional Field Experiences each candidate will be responsible for completing certain processes of the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.Interns will complete an entire Teacher Work Sample Portfolio during the Professional Internship.

 

B.††††††† Instructions for Compiling Teacher Work Sample Portfolio

 

The candidatesí Teacher Work Sample Portfolio must provide evidence of achievement of learning outcomes of both the College of Education (COE) and the candidatesí academic program, as well as his/her impact on P-12 student learning.Individual programs may have additional learning outcome requirements listed in their program guidelines.The candidatesí Teacher Work Sample Portfolio should be developed in consultation with program faculty, supervisor or clinical instructor.

 

††††††††††† Every Teacher Work Sample Portfolio is to include the following components:

 

        A statement of ownership.Complete a cover page that includes (a) name, (b) date submitted, (c) grade level taught, (d) subject taught, (e) university, (f) course number and title, (g) names of university supervisor/clinical instructor and cooperating teacher, and (h) name of school district.

 

        A Table of Contents that lists the sections and attachments contained within the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio with page numbers.

 

        A one-page Introduction to the Teacher Work Sample portfolio.

o       A scoring rubric for the Introduction can be found on page 14.

 

        A Philosophy Statement that addresses the candidateís view of the essence of education based on documentation and experience and supported by research.The focus should be the P-12 student and how the classroom can help develop the P-12 student into an effective citizen based on what has been learned at Kean University.The statement should be built around the SPECTRUM model of the College of Education based on knowledge, skills and dispositions/values.The statement should be kept to a readable length of no more that two to three double-spaced pages.The student should be prepared to discuss this statement in detail with an instructor.

o       A scoring rubric for the Philosophy Statement can be found on page 15.

 

        Charts, graphs and attachments.Charts, graphs and assessment instruments are required as part of the portfolio/TWS document.Other attachments, such as student work, may be provided.However, be very selective and make sure the attachments provide clear, concise evidence of how performance is related to TWS standards and the studentsí learning progress.

 

        Narrative length.A suggested page length for the narrative is given at the end of each component section.There is some flexibility of length across components, but the total length of the written narrative (excluding charts, graphs, attachments and references) should not exceed twenty (20) word-processed pages, double-spaced in 12-point font, with 1-inch margins.

 

        References and Credits (not included in total page length).If another personís ideas or material are referred to in the narrative, cite them in a separate section at the end of the narrative under References and Credits.Any standard form for references may be used; however, the American Psychological Association (APA) style is a recommended format (explained in the manual entitled ďPublication Manual of the American Psychological AssociationĒ).

 

        Anonymity.In order to insure the anonymity of students in the class, do not include any student names or identification in any part of the TWS.

 

        All sections of the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio should be placed in a binder and organized by clearly labeled subsections.

 

        Each Teacher Work Sample will be evaluated on its organization and format, use of standard written English, punctuation, capitalization, etc. and syntax or word choice.

 

o       A scoring rubric for the Writing Mechanics and Organization can be found on pages 16-17.

 

 

C.††††††† Description of the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Process

 

††††††††††† The Assignment

The Teacher Work Sample contains seven teaching processes identified by research and best practices as fundamental to improving P-12 student learning.Each Teaching Process is followed by a Teacher Work Sample Standard, the Task, Requirements, and a Rubric that defines levels of performance on the standard.The Standards and Rubrics will be used to evaluate each Teacher Work Sample.The Requirements help to document the extent to which each of the standards have been met.

 

Each intern is required to teach a comprehensive unit.Before teaching the unit, contextual factors will be described and learning goals identified based on New Jersey or district content standards.†† An assessment plan will be created to measure student performance before (pre-assessment), during (formative assessment) and after (post-assessment), and a plan for instruction developed.After teaching the unit, student learning will be analyzed and then instruction will be reflected upon and evaluated as related to student learning.

 

Successful teacher candidates support learning by designing a Teacher Work Sample that employs a range of strategies and builds on each P-12 studentís strengths, needs, and prior experiences.Through this performance assessment, candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to facilitate learning by meeting the following Teacher Work Sample standards:

 

        The candidate uses information about the learning-teaching context and P-12 student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment.

        The candidate sets significant, challenging, varied, and appropriate learning goals.

        The candidate uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess P-12 student learning before, during, and after instruction.

        The candidate designs instruction for specific learning goals, P-12 student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

        The candidate uses regular and systematic evaluations of P-12 student learning, to make instructional decisions.

        The candidate uses assessment data to profile P-12 student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.

        The candidate reflects on his or her instruction and P-12 student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

 

D.††††††† Candidate Responsibilities for Implementation of the Teacher Work Sample during the Field Experience Sequence

 

††††††††††† Level I:Introductory Field Experience Students

 

Candidates enrolled in Introductory Field Experience courses are responsible for developing a Statement of Philosophy and the Contextual Factors process of the Teacher Work Sample under the direction and guidance of the course instructor.Introductory Field Experiences courses include EC 2900; EMSE 2800, 2801, 2802, 5560; FA 2900; MUS 2900; PED 2800; or SPED 2120)

 

The Introductory Field course instructor will be responsible for assisting students in developing the Philosophy Statement and Contextual Factors, and reviewing and formally evaluating the Philosophy Statement and Contextual Factors using the rubrics for the Philosophy Statement and Contextual Factors and the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form found in Section V.

 

Transfer students who were given credit for an introductory field course at another college or university must meet with their program coordinator or designated faculty member to discuss the start of their Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.

 

Post-Baccalaureate students may incur problems with beginning the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio because of courses waived, i.e., introductory field; however they are still responsible for completing a Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.Post-Bac students are to be given information about completing the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio at the time of entry into the certification program.

 

Elementary, Middle & Secondary Education and Early Childhood graduate students who are seeking initial teacher certification are also responsible for completing an Teacher Work Sample Portfolio and will be given information on the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio process through their respective program.

 

††††††††††† Level II:Preprofessional Field Experience Students

 

Candidates enrolled in co-requisite courses with the Preprofessional Field Experience are responsible for developing a Mini-Teacher Work Sample that includes the following processes: Learning Goals, Assessment Plan, Design for Instruction, and Instructional Decision-Making.These co-requisite courses are: EC3300, EMSE3123, EMSE3210, EMSE3220, EMSE3230, EMSE3240, EMSE3450, EMSE3410, EMSE3403, FA3900/3901, FA5015/5016, MUS3310/3311, PED3610, 3611, SPED3000, THE3220.

Instructors from these university courses will be responsible for continuing the development of the Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio and will formally evaluate the Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.

 

The course instructor will be responsible for assisting students in developing the Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio processes, reviewing each studentís Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio and formally evaluating the Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio using the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Rubric and the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form found in Section V.

 

The university supervisor/clinical instructor will support the preprofessional field experience student in the development of the Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio, offering assistance and ensuring that the Mini-Teacher Work Sample processes are appropriate and reflect the SPECTRUM Model.The university supervisor/clinical instructor will not be responsible for formally evaluating the Mini-TWS portfolio at Level II.

 

Instructors/supervisors should use the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Processes as a guide to summarizing a candidatesí performance in each section.It is not necessary to sum the candidatesí score in each descriptor to achieve a total score in each section.

 

††††††††††† Level III:Professional Internship

 

Candidates enrolled in co-requisite course with the Professional Internship are required and responsible for developing a complete Teacher Work Sample Portfolio including the seven processes outlined in Section V.These processes are: Contextual Factors, Learning Goals, Assessment Plan, Design for Instruction, Instructional Decision-Making, Analysis of Student Learning and Reflection and Self-Evaluation.These co-requisite courses are:EC 4000; EDUC 4000; EMSE 4900; PED 4610; SPED 4200; EMSE 5314 or 5561.

 

The capstone course instructor from each course listed above is responsible for the continued development of the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.The capstone instructor will review each candidatesí Teacher Work Sample Portfolio, providing guidance in the development and reflection of Teacher Work Sample processes and formally evaluating the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio using the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Rubric and the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form in the evaluation.The Teacher Work Sample Portfolio evaluation will be included in the grade for the capstone course.

 

Graduate students in EC 5565 and EMSE 5561 will be responsible for completing the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.

 

The university supervisor/clinical instructor also is responsible for reviewing and formally evaluating each candidateís Teacher Work Sample Portfolio and providing assistance in the development process and the accompanying reflections.The university supervisor/clinical instructor will use the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Rubric and the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form in the evaluation with input from the cooperating teacher.

 

At Level III, the Teacher Work Sample will be evaluated by both the university course instructor AND the university supervisor/clinical instructor.

 

E.†††††††† Evaluating the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio

 

Level I

 

The instructor of the Introductory Field Experience course is responsible for scoring the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio using the appropriate rubrics for the philosophy statement and the Contextual Factors process and the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form.

 

Students who were given credit for an introductory field course at another college or university must meet with their program coordinator or designated faculty member to discuss the start of their educational Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.

 

Post-Baccalaureate students may incur problems with beginning the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio because of courses waived, i.e., introductory field; however they are still responsible for completing a Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.Post-Bac students are to be given information about completing the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio at the time of entry into the certification program.

 

Elementary, Middle & Secondary Education and Early Childhood graduate students who are receiving initial teacher certification are also responsible for completing a Teacher Work Sample Portfolio and will be given information on the process through their respective program advisors.

 

 

 

Instructors/supervisors are to use the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Processes form as a guide to summarizing a candidatesí performance in each section.It is not necessary to sum the candidatesí score in each descriptor to achieve a total score in each section.

 

Level II

 

The course instructor of the following courses: EC3300, EMSE3123, EMSE3210, EMSE3220, EMSE3230, EMSE3240, EMSE3450, EMSE3410, EMSE3403, FA3900/3901, FA5015/5016, MUS3310/3311, PED3610, 3611, SPED3000, THE3220 will be responsible for assisting students in developing the Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio processes, reviewing each studentís Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio and formally evaluating the Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio using the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Rubric and the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form.

 

The university supervisor/clinical instructor will support the preprofessional field experience student in the development of the Mini-Teacher Work Sample Portfolio processes offering assistance and ensuring that the processes and reflections are appropriate and reflect the SPECTRUM Model.The university supervisor/clinical instructor will not be responsible for formally evaluating the Mini-TWS portfolio at Level II.

 

Instructors/supervisors are to use the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Processes form as a guide to summarizing a candidatesí performance in each section.It is not necessary to sum the candidatesí score in each descriptor to achieve a total score in each section.

 

Level III

 

The university course instructor of the following capstone courses: EC4000, EDUC 4000, EMSE 4900, PED 4610 and SPED 4200, is to review each candidateís Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.He/She also will provide guidance in its continued development and formally evaluate each Teacher Work Sample Portfolio using the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Rubric and the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form in the evaluation.The Teacher Work Sample Portfolio evaluation will be included in the grade for the capstone course.

 

Graduate students in EC 5565, EC 5566, and EMSE 5561 will be responsible for completing the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.

 

The university supervisor/clinical instructor is responsible for reviewing and formally evaluating each candidateís Teacher Work Sample Portfolio and providing assistance in the development of the processes and the accompanying reflections.The university supervisor/clinical instructor will use the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Rubric and the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form in the evaluation with input from the cooperating teacher.

 

Instructors/supervisors should use the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Processes form as a guide to summarizing a candidatesí performance in each section.It is not necessary to sum the candidatesí score in each descriptor to achieve a total score in each section.

 

The cooperating teacher will use the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio as a catalyst for discussion about best teaching practices.The cooperating teacher will provide input to the university supervisor/clinical instructor regarding the evaluation of the Teacher Work Sample Portfolio.

 

Each professional intern will have two Teacher Work Sample Portfolio evaluations, one from the university supervisor/clinical instructor and one from the capstone instructor.

 

 

Evaluation Form Submission

 

A copy of the completed Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment form will be submitted to the Teaching Performance Center by the designated instructor of the Level I, II or III course.

 

For the professional internship, a completed Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Form will be submitted to the Teaching Performance Center by both the university supervisor/clinical instructor and the Level III course instructor.

 

 


INTRODUCTION TO PORTFOLIO

RUBRIC

 

Trait

1

2

3

4

5

 

Unacceptable

Beginning

Developing

Capable

Accomplished

Introduction to Portfolio

Does not define the purpose of the portfolio.

Vaguely defines the purpose of the portfolio.

Adequately defines the purpose of the portfolio.

Clearly and accurately delineates the purpose of the portfolio.

Defines the purpose of the TWS portfolio in a professional and articulate manner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is no description (or a very poor one) of the learning outcomes selected.

There is a brief description of outcomes, but the number is less than required.

There is an acceptable description of learning outcomes.

There is a specific description of the learning outcomes.

There is an exemplary description of the outcomes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are no connections made between the TWS elements and the College of Education Outcomes.

The connections made between the elements of the TWS and the COE Outcomes are minimal

The connections made between the elements of the TWS and the COE Outcomes are satisfactory.

The connections made between the elements of the TWS and the College of Education Outcomes are clear.

The connections made between the elements of the TWS and the COE Outcomes are clear and focused.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is no description of the TWS portfolio organization.

The description of the organization of the TWS portfolio is vague and not easily understood.

The description of the TWS portfolio organization is acceptable.

The description of the TWS portfolio organization is logical and in an easy to understand format.

The description of the organization is excellent, well thought out, and logical.


PHILOSOPHY STATEMENT

RUBRIC

 

Trait

1

2

3

4

5

 

Unacceptable

Beginning

Developing

Capable

Accomplished

Philosophy Statement

Offers no evidence that the candidate has the P-12 student as the focus.

Offers minimal evidence that the candidate has the P-12 student as the focus.

Offers adequate evidence that the candidate has the P-12 student as the focus.

Offers significant evidence that the candidate has the P-12 student as the focus.

Offers superior evidence that the candidate has the P-12 student as the focus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Offers no evidence that the SPECTRUM model is the framework

Offers minimal evidence that the SPECTRUM model is the framework.

Offers adequate evidence that the SPECTRUM model is the framework.

Offers significant evidence that the SPECTRUM model is the framework.

Offers superior evidence that the SPECTRUM model is the framework.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Offers no evidence that the candidate understands theory and research.

Offers minimal evidence that the candidate understands theory and research.

Offers adequate evidence that the candidate understands theory and research.

Offers significant evidence that the candidate understands theory and research.

Offers superior evidence that the candidate understands theory and research.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Offers no evidence that the candidate has gained insight into teaching and learning through field experiences and coursework.

Offers minimal evidence that the candidate has gained insight into teaching and learning through field experiences and coursework.

Offers adequate evidence that the candidate has gained insight into teaching and learning through field experiences and coursework.

Offers significant evidence that the candidate has gained insight into teaching and learning through field experiences and coursework.

Offers superior evidence that the candidate has gained insight into teaching and learning through field experiences and coursework.

Writing Mechanics and Organization

Rubric

Standard:TWS Portfolio is organized clearly, grammatically correct and written in standard English.

 

 

Trait

1

Unacceptable

2

Beginning

3

Developing

4

Capable

5

Accomplished

 

Writing Mechanics

The use of standard written English is unsatisfactory at this level.More than 10 errors in punctuation, capitalization, subject-verb agreement may exist or excessive fragments or run-ons may detract from the overall content of the writing.

The use of standard written English needs attention.More than 9 errors in punctuation, capitalization, subject-verb agreement may exist or 2 or more fragments or run-ons may exist.

The use of standard written English is adequate with no more than 8 errors in punctuation, capitalization, subject-verb agreement may exist or 1 or more fragments or run-ons may exist.

The use of standard written English is good with no more than 5 errors.

The use of standard written English is outstanding with no more than 2 errors in punctuation, capitalization, subject-verb agreement may exist.No fragments or run-ons may exist

 

 

 

 

 

 

Syntax

Syntax and word choice may be unsatisfactory, or the writing may lack cohesion.

Syntax and word choice may need attention, or the writing may lack cohesion.

Syntax and word choice are satisfactory, and the writing is cohesive.

Syntax and word choice are appropriate, and the writing is cohesive.

Syntax and word choice are clearly superior, and the writing is very cohesive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Mechanics and Organization

Rubric

Standard:TWS Portfolio is organized clearly, grammatically correct and written in standard English.

 

 

Trait

1

Unacceptable

2

Beginning

3

Developing

4

Capable

5

Accomplished

 

Organization ofTWS Portfolio

 

 

Poorly organized with no section dividers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No table of contents.

 

 

 

 

 

Not placed in a binder, no cover page.

Subsection not well defined and papers poorly placed in sections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of contents is brief and vague.

 

 

 

 

 

Binder or notebook is in poor condition with a poorly worded, difficult to read cover page.

Subsections are labeled and papers placed in appropriate sections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of contents is well organized.

 

 

 

 

 

Binder or notebook is organized with an appropriate cover page.

Subsections are labeled and stand out from folder and papers are placed in appropriate sections.

 

 

 

 

Table of contents is clear and reader can locate information with ease.

 

 

Binder is appropriate and the cover page is professionally done.

Subsections are labeled and tabs stand out from the contents of the portfolio with thoughtful placement of contents in appropriate places.

 

Table of contents is clear and alerts reader to contents of portfolio; reader can locate material easily.

 

Binder is attractive and cover page is professional, eyecatching and appropriate.

 




 

V.Teacher Work Sample

 

 

Performance Requirements

Teaching Processes

Standards and Indicators

Scoring Rubrics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:The materials in this document were developed by representatives of the Renaissance Partnership Institutions and are used with their permission.The Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality Project††† http://fp.uni.edu/itg

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 



Overview of Teacher Work Sample (TWS)

 

The Vision

Successful teacher candidates support learning by designing a Teacher Work Sample that employs a range of strategies and builds on each studentís strengths, needs, and prior experiences.Through this performance assessment, teacher candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to facilitate learning by meeting the following TWS standards:

             The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment.

             The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied, and appropriate learning goals.

             The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during, and after instruction.

             The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

             The teacher uses regular and systematic evaluations of student learning to make instructional decisions.

             The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.

             The teacher reflects on his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

 

The Assignment

The TWS contains seven teaching processes identified by research and best practice as fundamental to improving student learning.Each Teaching Process is followed by a TWS Standard, the Task, Requirements, and a Rubric that defines various levels of performance on the standard.The Standards and Rubrics will be used to evaluate the TWS.The Requirements help document the extent to which each of the standards has been met.

 

Teaching a comprehensive unit is required.Before teaching the unit, the contextual factors are to be described, learning goals based on state or district content standards, create an assessment plan designed to measure student performance before (pre-assessment), during (formative assessment) and after (post-assessment), and plan for instruction.After the unit has been taught, analyze and reflect on student learning.Then evaluate the instruction and teaching as they relate to student learning.

 

Format

      Ownership.Complete a cover page that includes (a) name, (b) date submitted, (c) grade level taught, (d) subject taught, (e) course number and title (f) names of clinical instructor, supervisor, faculty and cooperating teacher, and (g) name of school.

      Table of Contents.†† Provide a Table of Contents that lists the sections and attachments in the TWS document with page numbers.

      Charts, graphs and attachments.Charts, graphs and assessment instruments are required as part of the TWS document.Other attachments may be provided such as student work.However, please be very selective and make sure the attachments provide clear, concise evidence of teaching performance as related to TWS standards and studentsí learning progress.

      Narrative length.A suggested page length for the narrative is given at the end of each component section.There is some flexibility of length across components, but the total length of the written narrative (excluding charts, graphs, attachments and references) should not exceed twenty (20) word-processed pages, double-spaced in 12-point font, with 1-inch margins, not including charts, graphs and student work examples.

      References and Credits (not included in total page length).If another personís ideas or material are referred to in the narrative, these should be cited in a separate section at the end of the narrative under References and Credits.Any standard form for references may be used however, the American Psychological Association (APA) style is a recommended format (explained in the manual entitled ďPublication Manual of the American Psychological AssociationĒ).

      Anonymity.In order to insure the anonymity of students in the class, do not include any student names or identification in any part of the TWS.


Teacher Work Sample[KU1] [KU2] 

 

Teaching Processes Assessed by the Teacher Work Sample (TWS)

Teaching Processes, TWS Standards and Indicators

Contextual Factors

The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment.

v    Knowledge of community, school, and classroom factors

v    Knowledge of characteristics of students

v    Knowledge of studentsí varied approaches to learning

v    Knowledge of studentsí skills and prior learning

v    Implications for instructional planning and assessment

Learning Goals

The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals.

v    Significance, Challenge and Variety

v    Clarity

v    Appropriateness for students

v    Alignment with national, state or local standards

Assessment Plan

The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction.

v    Alignment with learning goals and instruction

v    Clarity of criteria for performance

v    Multiple modes and approaches

v    Technical soundness

v    Adaptations based on the individual needs of students

Design for Instruction

The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

v    Alignment with learning goals

v    Accurate representation of content

v    Lesson and unit structure

v    Use of a variety of instruction, activities, assignments and resources

v    Use of contextual information and data to select appropriate and relevant activities, assignments and resources

v    Use of technology

Instructional Decision-Making

The teacher uses ongoing analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.

v    Sound professional practice

v    Adjustments based on analysis of student learning

v    Congruence between modifications and learning goals

Analysis of Student Learning

The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.

v    Clarity and accuracy of presentation

v    Alignment with learning goals

v    Interpretation of data

v    Evidence of impact on student learning

Reflection and Self-Evaluation

The teacher reflects on his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

v    Interpretation of student learning

v    Insights on effective instruction and assessment

v    Alignment among goals, instruction and assessment

v    Implications for future teaching

v    Implications for professional development

 


Contextual Factors

 


To be completed by:Introductory (Level I) and Professional Interns (Level III).

 

TWS Standard

The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment.

 

Task

Discuss relevant factors and how they may affect the teaching-learning process.Include any supports and challenges that affect instruction and student learning.

 

Requirements

In the discussion, include:

        Community, district and school factors.Address geographic location, community and school population, socio-economic profile and race/ethnicity.Stability of community, political climate, community support for education, and other environmental factors may also be addressed.

NOTE:†† NJ School Report Card is a good resource.

        Classroom factors.Address physical features, availability of technology equipment and resources and the extent of parental involvement.Also to be discussed are other relevant factors such as classroom rules and routines, grouping patterns, scheduling and classroom arrangement.

        Student characteristics.Address student characteristics which must be considered as instruction design and learning assessed.Include factors such as age, gender, race/ethnicity, special needs, inclusion, English Language Learners (ELL), achievement/developmental levels, culture, language interests, learning styles/modalities or studentsí skill levels.In the narrative, make sure to address studentís skills and prior learning that may influence the development of learning goals, instruction and assessment.

NOTE:Include state/standardized test score data.

        Instructional implications.Address how contextual characteristics of the community, classroom and students have implications for instructional planning and assessment.Include specific instructional implications for English Language Learners (ELL) and special needs inclusion students multiple intelligences and any other factors that will influence how a unit is planned and implemented.Tell why this information is important to a teacher.

 

Checklist

N

Y

††††††††††

 

 

††††††††††† Demonstrates knowledge of community, school, and classroom factors

 

 

††††††††††† Demonstrates knowledge of characteristics of students

 

 

††††††††††† Demonstrates knowledge of studentsí varied approaches to learning

 

 

††††††††††† Demonstrates knowledge of studentsí skills and prior learning

 

 

††††††††††† Uses knowledge to implement instructional planning and assessment

 

 

 

 

Suggested Page Length: 2-4†††††††††††††††††††††††† †††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

 


Teacher Work Sample

Contextual Factors Rubric

 

TWS Standard:The teacher uses information about the learning/teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals, plan instruction and assess learning.

Rating →

Indicator ↓

1

Unacceptable

2

Beginning

3

Developing

4

Capable

5

Accomplished

Score

Knowledge of Community, School and Classroom Factors

Displays no knowledge of the characteristics of the community, school, and classroom.

Displays minimal, irrelevant, or biased knowledge of the characteristics of the community, school, and classroom.

Displays some knowledge of the characteristics of the community, school, and classroom that may affect learning.

Displays a comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of the community, school, and classroom that may affect learning.

Displays and explains an in-depth understanding of the characteristics of the community, school, and classroom that may affect learning with specific data, cited sources, and/or statistics.

 

Knowledge of Characteristics of Students

Displays no knowledge of student differences (e.g., development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities).

Displays minimal, stereotypical, or irrelevant knowledge of student differences (e.g., development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities).

Displays general knowledge of student differences (e.g., development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities).

Displays general and specific knowledge of student differences (e.g., development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities).

Displays and explains in-depth knowledge of student differences (e.g., development, interests, culture, abilities/disabilities).

 

Knowledge of Studentsí Varied Approaches to Learning

Fails to demonstrate understanding of a variety of approaches to learning among students, e.g., multiple intelligences and/or learning modalities.

Demonstrates general understanding of a variety of approaches to learning among students and may know one or two learning modalities but not a variety.

Demonstrates general understanding of a variety of approaches to learning among students and can distinguish between multiple modalities.

Articulates an understanding of varied learning modalities and multiple intelligences.

Articulates general and specific understanding of varied learning modalities and multiple intelligences.

 

Knowledge of Studentsí Skills and Prior Learning

Displays no knowledge of studentsí skills and previous learning and does not indicate either is important.

Identifies the value of understanding studentsí skills and previous learning but demonstrates its importance for the whole class only.

Identifies the value of understanding studentsí skills and previous learning for the group and individuals.

Displays knowledge of understanding studentsí skills and previous learning, including special needs students.

Articulates an in-depth understanding of studentsí skills and previous learning for the group and individuals including special needs students.

 

Implications for Instructional Planning and Assessment

Does not provide implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics or provides inappropriate implications.

Provides minimal implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics or provides inappropriate implications.

Provides general implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, or classroom characteristics.

Provides specific implications for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences and community, school, and classroom characteristics.

Provides specific implications and analyzes decisions for instruction and assessment based on student individual differences (ELL and inclusion students) and community, school, and classroom characteristics.

 


Learning Goals

 

 

To be completed by:Pre-professional Field Experience Students (Level II) and Professional Interns (Level III).

 

 

 

TWS Standard

The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals.

 

 

Task

Provide and justify the learning goals for the unit.

 

 

Requirements

        List the learning goals (not the activities) that will guide the planning, delivery and assessment of the unit.These goals should define what students are expected to know and be able to do at the end of the unit.The goals should be significant (reflect the big ideas or structure of the discipline) challenging, varied and appropriate and expressed in behavioral terms, i.e., defining what students are expected to be able to do.Number or code each learning goal so it can be referenced later.

        Explain how the goals are aligned with local, state, and national standards (identify the source of the standards).

        Describe the types and levels of the learning goals.

        Discuss why the learning goals are appropriate in terms of development; pre-requisite knowledge, skills; and other student needs.

 

 

 

Suggested Page Length: 1-2†††††††††††† †††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

 

 


Learning Goals

Rubric

 

TWS Standard:The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals.

 

Rating →

Indicator ↓

1

Unacceptable

2

Beginning

3

Developing

4

Capable

5

Accomplished

Score

Significance, Challenge and Variety

Goals are not in evidence.

Goals reflect only one type or level of learning

Goals reflect several types or levels of learning but lack significance or challenge

Goals reflect several types or levels of learning and are significant and challenging.

Goals are significant and challenge thought and expectations including three or more levels and types.

 

Clarity

Goals are vague or not in evidence.

Goals are not stated clearly and are activities rather than learning outcomes.

Some of the goals are clearly stated as learning outcomes.

Most of the goals are clearly stated as learning outcomes

Goals are clearly stated in behavioral terms.

 

Appropriateness for Students

Goals presented are inappropriate for the class or set unrealistic expectations for students.

Goals are not developmentally appropriate; nor address pre-requisite knowledge, skills, experiences, or other student needs.

Some goals are developmentally appropriate and address some pre-requisite knowledge, skills, experiences, and other student needs.

Most goals are developmentally appropriate; addresses pre-requisite knowledge, skills, experiences and other student needs are considered.

Goals demonstrates realistic expectations for all students in addition to providing for studentsí critical thinking and reflection.

 

Alignment with National, State or Local Standards

Fails to develop goals aligned with national, state and COE standards

Goals are not aligned with national, NJ standards or COE standards.

Some goals are aligned with national, state or COE standards.

Most of the goals are explicitly aligned with national, state and COE standards.

Goals are aligned with national, state, COE standards and are articulated through the lesson presentations.Alignments are explained.

 



Assessment Plan

 

 


To be completed by:Pre-professional Field Experience Students (Level II) and Professional Interns (Level III).

 

 

 

TWS Standard

The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction.

 

Task

Design an assessment plan to monitor student progress toward learning goal(s).Use multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during, and after instruction.These assessments should authentically measure student learning and may include performance-based tasks, paper-and-pencil tasks, or personal communication.Describe why the assessments are appropriate for measuring learning.

 

Requirements

        Provide an overview of the assessment plan.The purpose of this overview is to depict the alignment between learning goals and assessments.Show adaptations used to meet the individual needs of students to problem solve, or to reflect contextual factors.Include methods of formal, informal, and student self-assessment.For each learning goal include: assessments used to judge student performance, format of each assessment, and adaptations of the assessments for the individual needs of students based on pre-assessment and contextual factors.A visual organizer such as a table, outline or other means may be used to make the plan clear.

        Describe the pre- and post-assessments that are aligned with the learning goals.Clearly explain how pre-and post-assessments will be evaluated or scored, including criteria used to determine if the studentsí performance meets the learning goals.Include copies of assessments and/or student directions and criteria for judging student performance (e.g., scoring rubrics, observation checklist, rating scales, item weights, test blueprint, answer key).

        Discuss the plan for formative assessment that will help to determine student progress during the unit.Describe the assessments planned to evaluate student progress and comment on the importance of collecting that particular evidence.Although formative assessment may change as the unit progresses, the task here is to predict at what points in the instructional sequence it will be important to assess studentsí progress toward learning goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Example of Assessment Plan Table:Kindergarten

 

Visual Organizer

 

 

 

Learning Goals

Assessments

Format of Assessment

Adaptations

Learning Goal 1

 

Example:The student will link wild animals with their habitats.

Pre-Assessment

Checklist: game with animal masks & centers representing habitats (tree, lake, burrow, cave)

Repeat and modify instructions, as needed.Demonstrate and assist with cutting, gluing, etc.Provide model of a mask and model how to move to habitat centers.Keep all activities high-interest and brief.

 

Formative Assessment

 

Animal puppets and habitats (e.g., bird and nest) anecdotal records REQ & a picture journals

 

Provide concrete models and assistance with fine motor tasks, as needed.Provide multiple explanations and model performances.Process writing (i.e., dictations) when needed.Provide verbal cues and plenty of wait time for Q & A.

 

Post-Assessment

 

Checklist: game with animal masks & centers representing habitats

 

 

 

 

Suggested Page Length: 2 + pre- and post-assessment instruments, scoring rubrics/keys, and assessment plan table

 


Assessment Plan

Rubric

 

TWS Standard:The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals.

 

Rating →

Indicator ↓

1

Unacceptable

2

Beginning

3

Developing

4

Capable

5

Accomplished

Score

Alignment with Learning Goals and Instruction

Minimal plans for pre and post assessments are provided; assessments do not measure learning goals.

Content and methods of assessment lack congruence with learning goals or lack cognitive complexity.

Some of the learning goals are assess through the assessment plan, but many are not congruent with learning goals in content and cognitive complexity.

Each of the learning goals is assessed through the assessment plan; assessments are congruent with the learning goals in content and cognitive complexity.

All learning goals are assessed by the assessment plan, and provide students with constructive feedback on their learning.

 

Clarity of Criteria and Standards for Performance

The assessments contain no criteria for measuring student performance relative to the learning goals.

Assessments contain poorly stated criteria for measuring student performance leading to student confusion.

Assessment criteria have been developed, but they are not clear or are not explicitly linked to the learning goals.

Assessment criteria are clear and are explicitly linked to the learning goals.

Assessment criteria are linked to learning goals; accurately documenting student learning.

 

Multiple Modes and Approaches

The assessment plan fails to demonstrate evidence of student assessment other than after instructions.Limited knowledge of formal/informal assessments

The assessment plan includes only one assessment mode and does not assess students before, during, and after instruction.

The assessment plan includes multiple modes but all are either pencil/paper based (i.e., they are not performance assessments) and/or do not require the integration of knowledge, skills and critical thinking.

The assessment plan includes multiple assessment modes (including performance assessments, lab reports, research projects, etc.) and assesses student performance throughout the instructional sequence.

The assessment plan uses formal/informal assessments and studentís self-assessments to assess student performance and effectiveness of the instructional sequence.

 

Technical Soundness

Assessments are not designed to measure lessons goals and objectives; scoring procedures are inaccurate.

Assessments are not valid; scoring procedures are inaccurate; items or prompts are poorly written; directions and procedures are confusing to students.

Assessments appear to have some validity.Some scoring procedures are explained; some items or prompts are clearly written; some directions and procedures are clear to students

Assessments appear to be valid; scoring procedures are explained; most items or prompts are clearly written; directions and procedures are clear to students.

Assessments appear to be valid and clearly written.Assessments data used to document studentsí strengths as well as opportunities for learning.

 

Adaptations Based on the Individual Needs of Students

Teacher does not address or link assessments to identified contextual factors.

Teacher does not adapt assessments to meet the individual needs of students or these assessments are inappropriate.

Teacher makes adaptations to assessments that are appropriate to meet the individual needs of some students.

Teacher makes adaptations to assessments that are appropriate to meet the individual needs of most students.

Teacherís adaptations of assessments for all students needs to be met.Adaptations are creative and show evidence of outstanding problem-solving skills by teacher candidate.

 


Design for Instruction

Unit Plan and/or Lesson Plans

 


To be completed by:Pre-professional Field Experience Students (Level II) and Professional Interns (Level III).

 

 

TWS Standard

The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

 

Task

Describe how the design of the unit instruction relates to unit goals, studentsí characteristics and needs, and the specific learning context.

 

Requirements

        Results of pre-assessment.After administering the pre-assessment, analyze student performance relative to the learning goals.Depict the results of the pre-assessment in a format that allows patterns of student performance relative to each learning goal to be found.A table, graph, or chart may be used.Describe the pattern that was found that will guide the instruction or modification of the learning goals.

        Unit overview.Provide an overview of the unit.Use a visual organizer such as a block plan or outline to make the unit plan clear.Include the topic or activity planned for each day/period.Also indicate the goal or goals (coded from the Learning Goals section) that will be are addressed in each activity.Make sure that every goal is addressed by at least one activity and that every activity relates to at least one goal.

        Activities.Describe at least three unit activities that reflect a variety of instructional strategies/techniques and explain why those specific activities are planned.In the explanation for each activity, include:

 

-         how the content relates to the instructional goal(s),

-         how the activity stems from the pre-assessment information and contextual factors,

-         what materials/technology are necessary to implement the activity, and

-         how are plans made to assess student learning during and/or following the activity (i.e., formative assessment).

-         how the unit and/or lesson plan incorporates contextual factors particularly of the student learners.

 

        Technology.Describe how technology will be used in the planning and/or instruction.If there is no plan to use any form of technology, provide a clear rationale for its omission.

 

 

 

Suggested Page Length: 3 + visual organizer††††††††††††††††††††† ††††††††††† †††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

 


Design for Instruction

Rubric

 

TWS Standard:The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

Rating →

Indicator ↓

1

Unacceptable

2

Beginning

3

Developing

4

Capable

5

Accomplished

Score

Alignment with Learning Goals

No lesson is linked to learning goal.No learning activities are aligned to learning goals.

Few lessons are explicitly linked to learning goals.Few learning activities, assignments and resources are aligned with learning goals.Not all learning goals are covered in the design.

Most lessons are explicitly linked to learning goals.Most learning activities, assignments and resources are aligned with learning goals.Most learning goals are covered in the design.

All lessons are explicitly linked to learning goals.All learning activities, assignments and resources are aligned with learning goals.All learning goals are covered in the design.

All lessons are explicitly linked to learning goals, demonstrating critical thinking and reflection in activities and assignments.

 

Accurate Representation of Content

Teacher does not demonstrate purpose and relevancy of content.

Teacherís use of content appears to contain numerous inaccuracies.Content seems to be viewed more as isolated skills and facts rather than as part of a larger conceptual structure.

Teacherís use of content appears to be mostly accurate.Shows some awareness of the big ideas or structure of the discipline.

Teacherís use of content appears to be accurate.Focus of the content is congruent with the big ideas or structure of the discipline.

Teacher provides cross-content approach to student learning, stressing depth and breadth of content.

 

Lesson and Unit Structure

The lessons within the unit do not demonstrate knowledge of how content is created and developed.

The lessons within the unit are not logically organized

(e.g., sequenced).

The lessons within the unit have some logical organization and appear to be somewhat useful in moving students toward achieving the learning goals.

Most lessons within the unit are logically organized and appear to be useful in moving students toward achieving the learning goals.

All lessons within the unit demonstrate how knowledge of content is created and organized and integrates knowledge from other fields of content.

 

Use of a Variety of Instruction, Activities, Assignments and Resources

A single, instructional modality is used with textbook as only reference.

Little variety of instruction, activities, assignments, and resources.Heavy reliance on textbook or single resource (e.g., work sheets).

Some variety in instruction, activities, assignments, or resources but with limited contribution to learning.

Significant variety across instruction, activities, assignments, and/or resources.This variety makes a clear contribution to learning.

Instructional strategic assignments are varied to accommodate individual learners and to achieve lesson goals.

 

Use of Contextual Information and Data to Select Appropriate and Relevant Activities, Assignments and Resources

Instruction has not been based upon knowledge of subject matter, students or pre-assessment data.

Instruction has been designed with very limited reference to contextual factors and pre-assessment data.Activities and assignments do not appear productive and appropriate for each student.

Some instruction has been designed with reference to contextual factors and pre-assessment data.Some activities and assignments appear productive and appropriate for each student.

Most instruction has been designed with reference to contextual factors and pre-assessment data.Most activities and assignments appear productive and appropriate for each student.

All instruction addresses the diverse needs of individual students and contextual factors of community, school and class.

 

Use of Technology

Teacher does not use technology during instruction.

Technology is inappropriately used and inappropriate rationale is provided.

Teacher uses technology but it does not make a significant contribution to teaching and learning or teacher provides limited rationale for not using technology.

Teacher integrates appropriate technology that makes a significant contribution to teaching and learning or provides a strong rationale for not using technology.

Teacher integrates a variety of media and technology into instruction and relates both directly to lesson goals.

 


 

Instructional Decision-Making

 

 


To be completed by:Pre-professional Field Experience Students (Level II) and Professional Interns (Level III).

 

 

 

TWS Standard

The teacher uses on-going analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.

 

 

Task

Provide two examples of instructional decision-making based on studentsí learning or responses.

 

 

To be included:

        Think of a time during the unit when a studentís learning or response caused a modification of the original design for instruction.(The resulting modification may affect other students as well.)Cite specific evidence to support answers to the following:

-         Describe the studentís learning or response that caused a modification of plans.The studentís learning or response may come from a planned formative assessment or another source (not the pre-assessment).

-         Describe what was done next and explain why this would improve student progress toward the learning goal.

        Now, think of one more time during the unit when another studentís learning or response caused a modification of a different portion of the original design for instruction.(The resulting modification may affect other students as well.)Cite specific evidence to support the answers to the following:

-         Describe the studentís learning or response that caused an adjustment of modification of the plans.The studentís learning or response may come from a planned formative assessment or another source (not the pre-assessment).

-         Describe what was done next and explain why this would improve student progress toward the learning goal.

 

 

 

Suggested Page Length: 3-4††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††


Instructional Decision-Making

Rubric

 

TWS Standard:The teacher uses on-going analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.

 

Rating →

Indicator ↓

1

Unacceptable

2

Beginning

3

Developing

4

Capable

5

Accomplished

Score

Sound Professional Practice

Instructional decisions are inappropriate for age of student, content, and community.

Many instructional decisions are inappropriate and not pedagogically sound.

Instructional decisions are mostly appropriate, but some decisions are not pedagogically sound.

Most instructional decisions are pedagogically sound (i.e., they are likely to lead to student learning).

Most instructional decisions are pedagogically sound and build on concepts and skills previously learned.

 

Modifications Based on Analysis of Student Learning

Teacher treats class as ďone plan fits allĒ with no modifications.

Fails to demonstrate evidence of instructional modifications.

Limited modifications of the instructional plan have been made, to accommodate individual learners.

Some modifications of the instructional plan are made to address individual student needs, but these are not based on the analysis of student learning, best practice, or contextual factors.

Appropriate modifications of the instructional plan are made to address individual student needs.These modifications are informed by the analysis of student learning/performance, best practice, or contextual factors.

Appropriate modifications of the plan are made to individualize instruction.Rational to improve student progress is provided.

 

Congruence Between Modifications and Learning Goals

Inappropriate modification in instruction.

Modifications in instruction lack congruence with learning goals.

Modifications in instruction are somewhat congruent with learning goals.

Modifications in instruction are congruent with learning goals.

Modifications in instruction are congruent with learning goals and cites current research as the rationale for the modifications.

 



Analysis of Student Learning

 

 


To be completed by:Pre-professional Field Experience Students (Level II) and Professional Interns (Level III).

 

 

TWS Standard

The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.

 

 

Task

Analyze the assessment data, including pre, formative and post assessments and formative assessments to determine studentsí progress related to the unit learning goals.Use visual representations and narrative to communicate the performance of the whole class, subgroups, and two individual students.Conclusions drawn from this analysis should be provided in the ďReflection and Self-EvaluationĒ section.

 

 

To be included:

In this section, you will develop and implement a plan to collect, analyze and explain progress and achievement toward learning goals demonstrated by the whole class, subgroups of students, and individual students.

 

        Pre-assessment is a key to the unit.

 

In a unit where students have had previous study in the content area, pre and post assessment tests can be developed and administered to show the achievement progress from the unit execution.

Example: Students entering high school have studied U.S. History in elementary and middle school.A pre-test will determine what they have retained from this instruction and will provide the base data necessary for the teacher to plan the instructional goals and activities for a unit on the same chronological period or theme.The post-test can show the achievement gains in relation to the pre-test.

 

In a unit that is distinct, with no connection to prior study, pre-assessment should focus on pre-requisite knowledge, skills and student needs.What knowledge/skills are necessary for the students to successfully master the unit?Can the unit be started confident that the students have the necessary knowledge base to progress?What modifications in content, process or strategies may be necessary because of deficiencies in studentsí background knowledge/skills?

Example:The unit to be taught is the novel, The Scarlet Letter, by Hawthorne.This unit is distinct; the students have not read the novel so they cannot answer questions directly related to it.Therefore, there cannot be a valid comparison between a pre-test and post-test.The pre-assessment should focus on prior knowledge of various elements essential to the reading:definition of a novel, structure, direct/indirect characterization, external/internal setting, symbolism, figurative language, point of view, etc.

 

 

 

        Whole class.To analyze the progress of the whole class, create a table that shows pre- and post- assessment data on every student on every learning goal.Then, create a graphic summary that shows the extent to which the students made progress toward the learning criterion that was identified for each learning goal (identified in the Assessment Plan section).Summarize what the graph tells about studentsí learning in this unit (i.e., the number of students met the criterion).

 

        Subgroups.Select a group characteristic (e.g., gender, performance level, socio-economic status, language proficiency) to analyze in terms of one learning goal.Provide a rationale for the selection of this characteristic to form subgroups (e.g., girls vs. boys; high- vs. middle- vs. low-performers).Create a graphic representation that compares pre- and post-assessment results for the subgroups on this learning goal.Summarize what these data show about student learning.

 

        Individuals.Select two students that demonstrated different levels of performance.Explain why it is important to understand the learning of these particular students.Use pre-, formative, and post-assessment data with examples of the studentsí work to draw conclusions about the extent to which these students attained the two learning goals.Graphic representations are not necessary for this subsection.

 

Note:Provide possible reasons for why the students learned (or did not learn) in the next section, ďReflection and Self-Evaluation.Ē

 

 

 

Suggested Page Length: 4 + charts, graphs and examples of student work examples†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

 



Analysis of Student Learning

Rubric

 

TWS Standard:The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.

 

Rating →

Indicator ↓

1

Unacceptable

2

Beginning

3

Developing

4

Capable

5

Accomplished

Score

Clarity and accuracy of Presentation

Presentation does not include data.

Presentation is not clear and accurate; it does not accurately reflect the data.

Presentation is understandable and contains few errors.

Presentation is easy to understand and contains no errors of presentation.

Contains no errors of presentation.Presentation is communicated with the use of technology and media.

 

Alignment with Learning Goals

Neither analysis of student learning nor visual representation is aligned with learning goals.

Analysis of student learning is aligned with learning goals.Visual representations do not include whole class, sub-groups or individual students.

Analysis of student learning is general with learning goals and/or fails to provide a comprehensive profile of student learning relative to the goals for the whole class, subgroups, and two individuals.

Analysis is fully aligned with learning goals and provides a comprehensive profile of student learning for the whole class, subgroups, and two individuals.

Analysis is thorough and complete, recognizing student progress in developing content proficiency.Visual and narrative summaries demonstrate the extent of student progress.

 

Interpretation of Data

Interpretation is unsupported by data

Interpretation is inaccurate, and conclusions are missing.

Interpretation is technically accurate, but conclusions are missing or not fully supported by data.

Interpretation is meaningful, and appropriate conclusions are drawn from the data.

Interpretation is comprehensive.Appropriate conclusions are drawn from the data.Candidate has detailed the assessment and evaluation of student gains.

 

Evidence of Impact on Student Learning

Analysis is weak and fails to provide subgroup achievement

Analysis of student learning fails to include evidence of impact on student learning in terms of numbers of students who achieved and made progress toward learning goals.No remediation is provided.

Analysis of student learning includes incomplete evidence of the impact on student learning in terms of numbers of students who achieved and made progress toward learning goals.Limited remediation is provided.

Analysis of student learning includes evidence of the impact on student learning in terms of number of students who achieved and made progress toward each learning goal.Remediation is specific.

A thorough analysis of the learning gains of all students and subgroups is presented.Remediation is specific.

 

 


Reflection and Self-Evaluation

 

 


To be completed by:Professional Interns (Level III).

 

 

 

TWS Standard

The teacher analyzes the relationship between his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

 

 

Task

Reflect on the internís performance as a teacher and link P-12 student learning results to this performance incorporating current research as supporting documentation.Evaluate internís performance and identify future actions for improved practice and professional growth.

 

 

To be included:

        Select the learning goal where the P-12 students were most successful.Provide two or more possible reasons for this success.Consider goals, instruction, and assessment along with P-12 student characteristics and other contextual factors under the internís control.

        Select the learning goal where P-12 students were least successful.Provide two or more possible reasons for this lack of success.Consider goals, instruction, and assessment along with P-12 student characteristics and other contextual factors under the internís control.Discuss what could be done differently or better in the future to improve the internís performance.

        Reflection on possibilities for professional development.Describe at least two professional learning goals that emerged from the insights and experiences with TWS.Identify two specific steps that will be taken to improve performance in the critical area(s) identified.

 

 

 

Suggested Page Length: 2††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

 






Reflection and Self-Evaluation

Rubric

 

TWS Standard: The teacher analyzes the relationship between his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

Rating →

Indicator ↓

1

Unacceptable

2

Beginning

3

Developing

4

Capable

5

Accomplished

Score

Interpretation of Student Learning

No evidence or reasons provided to support conclusions drawn in ďAnalysis of Student LearningĒ section.

 

Provides one possible reason as evidence to support conclusions drawn in Analysis of Student Learning.

Provides evidence but simplistic, superficial reasons are given or hypotheses to support conclusions drawn in ďAnalysis of Student LearningĒ section.

Uses evidence to support conclusions drawn in ďAnalysis of Student LearningĒ section.

Uses evidence to support more than four conclusions drawn in ďAnalysis of Student LearningĒ section.Explores multiple hypotheses for why some students did and others did not meet learning goals.

 

Insights on Effective Instruction and Assessment

Provides no rationale for why some activities or assessments were more successful than others.

 

Rationale for activities or assessments presented in confusing manner; insights limited to knowledge-based instruction and use of formal assessments.

Identifies successful and unsuccessful activities or assessments and superficially explores reasons for their success or lack thereof (no use of theory or research).

Identifies successful and unsuccessful activities and assessments and provides plausible reasons (based on theory or research) for their success or lack thereof.

Reflects on own performance as a teacher focusing on the impact of the experience on student learning.Current research findings are incorporated as supportive documentation.

 

Alignment Among Goals, Instruction and Assessment

Does not connect learning goals, instruction, and assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction and/or the connections are irrelevant or inaccurate.

 

Connections among learning goals, instructions and assessments are irrelevant or inaccurate.

Connects learning goals, instructions, and assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction, but misunderstandings or conceptual gaps are present.

Logically connects learning goals, instruction, and assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction.

Connects learning goals, instruction and assessment results in the discussion of student learning and effective instruction.Current research findings are incorporated as supportive documentation.

 

Implications for Future Teaching

Provides no ideas or inappropriate ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment.

Provides limited ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment.Rationale is inadequate; or absent.

Provides ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment but offers no rationale for why these changes would improve student learning.

Provides ideas for redesigning learning goals, instruction, and assessment and explains why these modifications would improve student learning.

Provides a repertoire of strategies, offering specific alternative actions complete with probable successes for student learning.

 

Implications for Professional Development

Provides no professional learning goals.

Provides goals that are not related to the insights and experiences described in this section.

Presents professional learning goals that are not strongly related to the insights and experiences described in this section and/or provides a vague plan for meeting the goals.

Presents professional learning goals that emerge from the insights and experiences descried in this section.

Presents four or more professional learning goals that clearly emerge from the insights and experiences described in this section.Describes at least two specific steps to meet these goals.

 


Processes of Teacher Work Sample Portfolio Assessment Form

 

1 = Unacceptable2 = Beginning††††††††††††††††††††† 3 = Developing†††††††††††††††††††† 4 = Capable†††††††††††††††††††††††††† 5 = Accomplished

Introduction to the Portfolio†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

The purpose is defined.

 

1

2

3

4

5

The outcomes met by the candidate are described.

 

1

2

3

4

5

There are relevant connections made between the elements of the TWS and the outcomes.

 

1

2

3

4

5

There is a description of the organization of the TWS Portfolio

 

1

2

3

4

5

Philosophy Statement†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

There is evidence that the candidate has the student as the focus.

 

1

2

3

4

5

The SPECTRUM Model is used as the framework.

 

1

2

3

4

5

The candidate understands theory and research.

 

1

2

3

4

5

The candidate has gained insight into teaching and learning through field experiences and coursework.

1

2

3

4

5

Contextual Factors†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

Knowledge of community, school, and classroom factors.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Knowledge of characteristics of student, skills, and prior knowledge.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Knowledge of studentsí varied approaches to learning.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Knowledge of studentsí skills and prior knowledge.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Implications for instructional planning and assessment.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Learning Goals†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

Significance, challenge, variety, and appropriateness for students.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Clarity.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Appropriateness for students††††

 

1

2

3

4

5

Alignment with national, state, or local standards.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Assessment Plan†††††† †††††††††††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

Alignment with learning goals and instruction.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Clarity of criteria for performance.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Technically sound multiple modes and approaches.††††††††††

 

1

2

3

4

5

Adaptations based on individual needs of students.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Design for Instruction†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

Alignment with learning goals.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Lesson and unit structure with accurate representation of content.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Use of a variety of instruction, activities, assignments and resources.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Use of contextual information and data to select appropriate and relevant activities, assignments, resources.

1

2

3

4

5

Use of technology.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Instructional Decision-Making††††† ††††††††††††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

Sound professional practice.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Adjustments based on analysis of learning.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Congruence between modifications and learning goals.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Analysis of Student Learning†††††††††††††† †††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

Clarity and accuracy of presentation.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Alignment with learning goals.†††††††††††††

 

1

2

3

4

5

Interpretation of data.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Evidence of impact on student learning

 

1

2

3

4

5

Reflection and Self-Evaluation†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

Interpretation of student learning.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Insights on effective instruction and assessment.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Alignment among goals, instruction, and assessment.

 

1

2

3

4

5

Implications for future teaching.†††††††

 

1

2

3

4

5

Implications for professional development

 

1

2

3

4

5

Writing Mechanics and Appearance†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

Section Score

1

2

3

4

5

Use of standard English is satisfactory (no more than 8 errors).

 

1

2

3

4

5

Syntax and word choice is satisfactory, and the writing is cohesive.††

 

1

2

3

4

5

Appearance is adequate with section dividers and a table of contents.

 

1

2

3

4

5

 



INSERT TWS PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT FORM


 

Teacher Work Sample

Integration of Teacher Work Sample Processes and COE Learning Goals

 

TEACHING PROCESSES ASSESSED BY THE KEAN COE TEACHER WORK SAMPLE

Contextual Factors

The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and plan instruction and assessment.

v    Knowledge of community, school, and classroom factors(K-C,D) (S-G) (D-C)

v    Knowledge of characteristics of students(K-B,C) (S-B,E) (D-A)

v    Knowledge of studentsí varied approaches to learning(K-A,C) (S-A,B) (D-A)

v    Knowledge of studentsí skills and prior learning(K-A,C) (S-A,B) (D-A)

v    Implications for instructional planning and assessment(K-E) (S-A,E) (D-B)

Learning Goals

The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied and appropriate learning goals.

v    Significance, Challenge and Variety(K-A,B,C) (S-A,B,C) (D-A,B)

v    Clarity(S-A,B,C)

v    Appropriateness for students(K-B,C) (S-B,C) (D-A,B)

v    Alignment with national, state or local standards(K-A,B) (S-A)

Assessment Plan

The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals to assess student learning before, during and after instruction.

v    Alignment with learning goals and instruction(K-A,B,E) (S-A,B,E)

v    Clarity of criteria for performance(K-E) (S-E)

v    Multiple modes and approaches(K-D,E) (S-E) (D-A)

v    Technical soundness(K-E) (S-D,E)

v    Adaptations based on the individual needs of students(K-B,C,E) (S-A,B,C,E) (D-A)

Design for Instruction

The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

v    Alignment with learning goals(K-A,B,E) (S-A,B,E)

v    Accurate representation of content(K-A) (S-A,C,D) (D-C)

v    Lesson and unit structure(K-A,B,C,D,E) (S-A,B,C,D,F) (D-B,C)

v    Use of a variety of instruction, activities, assignments and resources (K-B,C) (S-B,C,G) (D-A,B,C)

v    Use of contextual information and data to select appropriate and relevant activities, assignments and resources (K-B,C) (S-A,G) (D-B,C)

v    Use of technology(S-B,D)

Instructional Decision-Making

The teacher uses ongoing analysis of student learning to make instructional decisions.

v    Sound professional practice(K-A,B,C,D,E) (S-A,B,C,D,E,G) (D-A,B,C,D)

v    Adjustments based on analysis of student learning(K-B,C,E) (S-E)

v    Congruence between modifications and learning goals(K-A,B,E) (S-A,B,E)

Analysis of Student Learning

The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.

v    Clarity and accuracy of presentation(K-E) (S-D,E)

v    Alignment with learning goals(K-A,B,E) (S-A,B,E)

v    Interpretation of data(K-B,C,E) (S-D,E) (D-B,C)

v    Evidence of impact on student learning(K-B,C,E) (S-B,C,E,G) (D-A,B)

Reflection and Self-Evaluation

The teacher reflects on his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

v    Interpretation of student learning(K-B,E) (S-C,E,F,G) (D-A,B,C,F)

v    Insights on effective instruction and assessment(K-B,E) (S-B,E,F) (D-B,F)

v    Alignment among goals, instruction and assessment(K-A,B,E) (S-A,B,E,F)

v    Implications for future teaching(S-F) (D-F)

v    Implications for professional development(S-F) (D-F)

Letters in parentheses refer to COE Learning Outcomes: K = Knowledge, S = Skills, D = Disposition

†† See pages 4, 5 & 6


 

VI.†††† RESOURCES

 

 

Unit Assessment System: Report to the Indiana Professional Standards Board (1999, December).

Muncie, IN: Ball State University, Teachers College.

 

Bernhardt, Victoria (2002).The School Portfolio Toolkit; A Planning, Implementation and Evaluation

Guide for Continuous School Improvement.Larchmont, NY: Eye on Education.

 

Bullock, A. and Hawk, P., (2001). Developing a Teaching Portfolio; A Guide for the Preservice and

Practicing Teacher. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall.

 

Campbell, D., Cignetti, P., Melenyzer, B., Nettles, D., & Wyman, R. (1997).How to Develop a

Professional Portfolio: A Manual for Teachers. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

 

Danielson, C, (1996).Enhancing Professional Practice: Framework for Teaching.Alexander, VA:

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

Knight, M. & Gallero, D. (1994).Portfolio Assessment, Applications of Portfolio Analysis.Lanham,

MD: University Press of America.

 

New Jersey Journal of Supervision and Curriculum Development: Standards and Assessment for Student Achievement.(2001). New Brunswick, NJ:Downtown Printing.

 

Phi Delta Kappa International & Ball State University Teachers College, (2000).Student Teacherís Portfolio Handbook, Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa International.

 

Rakow, S. (1999).Involving Classroom Teachers in the Assessment of Preservice Intern Portfolios.

Action in Teacher Education.

 

Spence, R. and Graham, Shari (2000).The High Performance Toolbox.Evergreen CO: Peak Learning

Systems.

 

Wile, I. (1999).Professional Portfolios: the ďTalkĒ of the Student Teaching Experience.The Teacher

Educator 34 (3), 215-23 1.

 

Wolf, K. (1996).Developing an Effective Teaching Portfolio.Educational Leadership 53(6), 34-37.

 

Wyatt, R., III & Looper, S. (1999).So You Have to Have a Portfolio:A Teacherís Guide to Preparation

and Presentation.Thousand Oaks, CA:Corwin Press, Sage. 16

 

 

 

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE REFERENCES

 


        http://education.csufresno.edu/rengroup/

        http://www.uni.edu/itq/

 



[1] WEBSTERíS SEVENTH NEW COLLEGIATE DICTIONARY.SPRINGFIELD, MA: G & C MERRIAM CO., 1972


 [KU1]MOVE THIS PAGE AS IS TO THE END AFTER ASSESSMENT BEFORE RESOURCES

 [KU2]IN PLACE USE THIS INFO WITHOUT LETTERS (SEE YELLOW SHEET)